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FAQ's

What are your payment options?
Do I need to come into your showroom before having someone come to my house to provide a quote?
I work until 5pm and have a hard time getting into your showroom during regular hours, what can I do?
Will you install a product that I have purchased elsewhere?
Fireplace or Insert, which do I need?
Which fuel should I use?
Do you do gas fireplace service work?
My remote stopped working, help?
Do you do WETT inspections?
What does WETT stand for?
Who / what is Warnock Hersey?
What maintenance should I perform on my wood stove?
What type of wood should I be burning and how will it affect the performance of my wood stove?
Why won't my chimney draft properly?
Will I need to clean the door glass, or does it stay clean by itself?
I heard that catalytic wood stoves are more efficient than non-cats.
What are the EPA numbers all about?
What does EPA mean?

What are your payment options?

We currently accept cash, cheque, and interac, VISA, Master Card and Discover Cards.

Do I need to come into your showroom before having someone come to my house to provide a quote?

We would like all of our customers to come into our showroom, we have extensive displays and we feel that a fireplace should be seen in person. At the showroom we can look at multiple styles of fireplaces, help you narrow your choices down and discuss a budget. At that point we can decide if the next step is a home visit.

I work until 5pm and have a hard time getting into your showroom during regular hours, what can I do?

Wilk Stove can accommodate busy schedules by offering after hour's appointments. Please call us or email us to book an appointment.

Will you install a product that I have purchased elsewhere?

We do not install products that have been bought elsewhere. We service what we sell and install. To ensure quality products, happy customers and a great installation we will only sell the products that we know and have success with.

Fireplace or Insert, which do I need?

If you're building a new space from scratch or adding a fire to a space that's never had a fire before, choose a fireplace. If you have a fireplace already installed into a wood cavity then choose a fireplace. If you're remodeling and want to modify an existing metal or masonry fireplace to improve its efficiency and / or update its appearance, choose an insert.

Which fuel should I use?

Gas is best if you want heat at the touch of a button, you want a real flame with minimal effort or you want heat and a real flame from a clean burning fuel.

Wood is best if you want a heat source that's independent of local utilities, you prefer the sights, sounds and smells of a real fire or you prefer using a local and / or renewable fuel resource for heat.

Electric is best if it is an easy-to-implement, reasonably priced solution, you want plug-and-play ambiance; heat is optional, or if you're primarily interested in easy ambiance.

Do you do gas fireplace service work?

No, we do not have a service department. We can make recommendations depending on your needs. Please call or email us to get a list of service technicians according to your needs.

My remote stopped working, help?

The first thing to do is to change the batteries in both the handheld remote control and the receiver in the gas appliance, normally located under the fireplace. If the remote & receiver have been out of batteries for a while, you may need to "learn" your remote to the receiver again. There is a small button on the receiver; you will need to use the end of a sharp pencil or paper clip to depress this button. Depress & hold for 5 seconds, the receiver will make a series of beeps, then press the on/off or mode button on your remote control, there will be more beeps coming from both the handheld remote & receiver. They are now communicating. If you have completed these steps and your remote is still not working please contact us directly.

Do you do WETT inspections?

Wilk Stove Ltd. offers WETT inspections and installation certificates on any installation that we have performed. We will not inspect any installations done by anyone other than our trained installers in the winter seasons, check with us about doing inspections in the Spring / Summer months.

What does WETT stand for?

WETT stands for Wood Energy Technology Transfer Inc. a non-profit training and education association that promotes the safe and effective use of wood burning systems in Canada. They provide intensive training in Code Compliance, House as a System, Basic Inspection and Chimney Sweeping. They provide certification to its members who successfully complete the courses, pass the exam & complete in the field training. They have established a code of ethics requiring professionalism in all aspects of work. Manufacturers of wood burning appliances, as well as insurance companies recommend that your wood burning appliance and / or chimney be installed by WETT certified installer.

Who / what is Warnock Hersey?

Warnock Hersey is the testing laboratory used by many manufacturers to test and certify clearances used for installation. There are many testing laboratories, mainly Underwriters Laboratories of Canada, Omni Test Laboratories Inc. and Warnock Hersey.

What maintenance should I perform on my wood stove?

Chimney's connected to a wood stove should be inspected and cleaned annually. The wood stove's gaskets on the door should be changed every year to two years. The glass on the stove should be cleaned with a specialized wood stove glass cleaner as needed. Replace firebrick & baffles when deteriorating. If you have questions send a photo via email or call us, we'd be happy to help.

What type of wood should I be burning and how will it affect the performance of my wood stove?

Your wood stove will perform best and last longer if you burn cord wood that is cut, split and dried for 1 year before use. Never burn driftwood, painted wood, wood with nails in it or pressed particle board. These woods contain chemicals that can damage your stove and chimney, as well as harm the environment.

There are several factors that impact your stove's performance. The most important factors are the type of wood you burn, as well as whether or not the wood is properly dried, or seasoned.

Each species of wood has its own characteristics, yet all wood has roughly the same energy content by weight. The different species vary only in density. Ultimately, the most important thing is to use wood that is cut and split to the right size, and that the wood is properly dried.

Why won't my chimney draft properly?

There are many factors that result in a stove not drafting properly. Stoves are normally installed "to code" which may mean they are safe, but the code does not mean it will perform properly.

A properly sized chimney is crucial to a stove's performance. The old school of thinking said the bigger the chimney the better the draft. As stoves burn more and more efficiently, there is less heat going up the chimney. Consequently there may not be enough heat in an oversized chimney for the stove to burn correctly.

Smoke likes to travel straight up. Every elbow or offset creates a point of resistance that can cause trouble.

Chimneys that run up the outside of a home tend to be very cold. It takes a lot more heat to create draft in an outside chimney than a chimney that is installed on the inside of the home. Metal pre-fabricated chimneys on the outside of the house work best when installed in an insulated chase.

Negative pressure in your home can cause a stove to not draft properly. As homes are built tighter in recent years, there is a lot less air to replace air that is used in the combustion process. Basements usually have a lot of negative pressure, as the entire house above it acts as a chimney for the warm air inside. Many kitchen exhaust fans now exceed 900 cubic feet per minute. Bathroom fans and clothes dryers also remove air from the home. Your stove can only function properly if there is a sufficient amount of fresh air available for it to burn.

External factors such as the design of the roof, nearby trees, wind patterns and the location of the home can have an effect.. We are experts in understanding these factors and their effects on a stove's performance. We offer expert consultations when purchasing your new wood burning appliance.

Will I need to clean the door glass, or does it stay clean by itself?

In general, no glass on a heating appliance's firebox will stay perfectly clean.

Gas-fired stove: You should clean the glass on your door at least once a year. The quality of the gas supplied can determine how frequently you may need to clean the glass. All fuel gasses contain some impurities, and also generate byproducts of combustion that will adhere to the glass usually as a faint white residue.

Wood stove: An air-wash system is built into every stove we sell. This system uses the draft to cause a curtain of clean, hot air to blow down the inside of the glass. This air, and the fire's radiant heat help minimize door glass fogging or discoloring, making the large windows virtually "self-cleaning" to maximize your view of the gently flickering flames.

However, initial start ups, slow fires, "green" or very resinous wood, poor draft, and improper fuels can cause some darkening, or sooting of the glass. Ideal conditions produced by a high/ hot fire fueled by good seasoned wood at least once a day will help keep the glass fee of soot, or creosote.

I heard that catalytic wood stoves are more efficient than non-cats.

The EPA labeled efficiency number was created during the early stages of certification development procedures; it is based on an "average" stove, not your specific stove model. This efficiency number is not a good reference to base your stove purchase upon. We recommend making your decision on your heating needs; Do you want fast "on and off" heat? (steel) Medium heat? (cast iron) Long, steady heat? (soapstone).

What are the EPA numbers all about?

Wood smoke is often full of unburnt wood particles and other by-products of combustion. Test labs can measure the amount of particulate in the smoke. Prior to 1988 when the government started regulating wood stoves, the best data available shows the average stove produced about 80 100 grams per hour of this particulate. By 1992 the EPA Phase II required all non-catalytic stoves to produce less than 7.4 grams per hour and 4.0 grams per hour if the stove used a catalytic combustor. Catalytic requirements are more stringent because the effectiveness of the catalyst degrades over its life expectancy; non-catalytic stoves have consistent emissions for the life of the stove. Consequently, the two stove types average out to be the same.

What does EPA mean?

EPA stands for Environmental Protection Agency in the US. This agency sets the emission standards for the US and some provinces in Canada including British Columbia. Any new wood stove sold in British Columbia must be EPA approved.